Get Rich - Stay Rich - Investing for Monthly Income

Posts Tagged ‘protective put’

How To Use a Protective Put with a Covered Call

One of the basic mistakes that new covered call traders make is that they trade for the highest premium available to maximize their monthly income without looking at the amount of risk they are taking on with this type of trade.  When option premiums are high there is a reason for the increase in option pricing because of some uncertainty or increased risks.  The advanced covered call trader knows this and uses a protective put to manage their risk of loss on a high volatility trade.

The classic strategy is protect a position is to buy a put which is referred to as a “protective put.”  With a put buy you have the right (but no obligation) to sell a stock at the strike price of the put.  The protective put allows the stock owner to keep the stock but limits the amount of downsize to a lower stock price at the put’s strike price.  The stock owner no longer has price risk once the stock price falls below the put strike price as they can sell the stock at the put strike price before the option expires.
Stock investors refer to a put as price insurance as the cost of buying a put is similar to paying an insurance premium and the ownership of the put is
the insurance policy.  The management of stock price insurance is an additional cost to the trade.  For covered call investors, they must determine if it is worthwhile to buy the put as it will affect their monthly income plan.  The amount of buying a put depends on the amount of time before expiration, the strike price and the implied volatility of the put.  As you know, as volatility increases then option prices will tend to increase as well.

The table below shows an example trade with Under Armour (UA).  The stock is trading at $67.74 per share.  This example displays buying a put for protection at three strike prices: ITM, ATM & OTM.  As shown, the more in-the-money (ITM) the put then the more protection in stock price and less risk exposure in dollar terms.  The risk exposure is calculated by subtracting the put strike price from the net debit (share price + put cost).

The bottom two rows in the table show selling an ATM October call of 67.5 on UA.  You will receive $5.80 in premium for every call sold.  If you subtract this call premium from the risk exposure shown in the top portion of the table, you get the total risk exposure of the covered call with protective put trade.

Again – the more ITM the trade, the less risk exposure.  This example assumes the protective put strike price comes into play.  Of course, you would not usually use this strategy in a bull market as it is more effective during bear markets with increased levels of uncertainty.  You can also play what-if by using different
expiration months for the protective put.

How to use a protective put with a covered call

Click to enlarge

 

How To Recover From A Covered Call Trade

To remind you, this trade involves holding at least 100 shares of a company’s stock, then selling call options against them (one options contract for every 100 shares you own).  If the underlying stock declines, you’ll begin to see the option’s premium erode, too. But depending on the timeframe of the trade, you may see a greater loss in your stock position in real dollar terms than you will in your option position.  The objective of covered call writing is to produce monthly investment income and to protect your capital.

To calculate your exact current position in the trade versus when you placed it, you must:

  • Get the quote for the stock.
  • Get the quote for the option.
  • Subtract the current option price from the current stock price.
  • Compare that number to your net cost of the trade when you executed it.

The net cost of the trade is the breakeven when you enter a trade.  You can use this number as your threshold to take action if the stock price decreases to this point.  Some covered call investors use the breakeven to unwind a trade.  If the new net number is below your stop-loss threshold – let’s say 20% – then you have the following options:

  • Either: Stick with the position and hope that the share price recovers, so you can sell another option at expiration.
  • Or: Reverse the trade by buying back the current option and selling the stock.
  • Or: You can also buy back the option and sell another one at a lower strike price to mitigate some of the loss. However, if the new strike price you choose is below your cost, then you’re going to take a loss there, too.
  • Or: Buy a protective put on the stock used in the covered call trade.  The put will increase in value if the stock price falls so it will hedge losses from your stock ownership.  Of course you can buy a put as protection for all covered call trades especially when you plan to continueously sell calls each month on the same stock.  If you use a protective put, then select a month with a longer timeframe than the call sold against the stock.

But there’s one way to pretty much avoid this situation entirely… Sell deep-in-the-money calls against your position.  While this does reduce the overall return available, the upside is that it also reduces your net cost significantly and thus provides a nice cushion against risk.

Shop at Chanceslilyshop.com

Shop at Chanceslilyshop.com

Subscribe for FREE Trades

Subscribe for FREE Trades

* indicates required
/ ( mm / dd )
Archives