Get Rich - Stay Rich - Investing for Monthly Income

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Passive Income Investing

Passive income is defined as “income generated with minimal work through your investments such as interest, dividends, or option premiums but also includes any income system that generates income for you!”
In order to increase your quality of life, the only realistic strategy is to increase your income, and reduce the amount of hours you work to earn income.  How do you do this you might ask? By using time tested wealth creation strategies and investment techniques to create, increase and maintain your passive income.

Passive Income Investing

The easiest way to make passive income is to earn interest or dividends on bank accounts, stocks and electronic-traded funds (ETFs).  This is one of the safest strategies when you own the right securities.  Many ETFs pay monthly dividends that can be combined to create a significant number of passive income sources or checks each month.  More on this later.

One of the best ways to leverage your investment capital is to use stock options. There are literally thousands of ways to use options, both as a trading tool and as a way to protect or hedge your investments.  But options can also be used to create passive income through becoming an option ‘writer’ instead of a ‘taker’.  Here, you get paid a premium when you sell the rights to an option.  This premium is your passive income source.

The optimal strategy is to combine investments that make you rich with investments that keep you rich.  I refer to the former as your “get rich” account and the later as your “stay rich” account.  Basically, you make passive income from your get rich investing and store it in your stay rich investments.  It really is that simple.
Get Rich Passive Incomes
The following is a list of passive income generators you will recieve in each Passive Income Investment Report.  These investments are what you will use to get rich by investing in these instruments each month.  You will recieve a number of trades for each category but you decide which types of passive incomes you are comfortable investing in your account.
  1. Covered calls on stocks you purchase.  We have a proven system of identifying conservative covered call investments that can generate 3-5% return each month.  You can select from our list or invest in all recommendations.  Our system focuses on selecting stocks with the right volitility so you don’t get burned by high-risk investments.
  2. Cash-secured PUT trades to enter a position.  When you find a stock you want to purchase, then sell put options on the stock to lower the purchase price and to collect option premium for cash.  Do this monthly for income until the stock is put to you,  Then, sell covered call options on the stock.
  3. Dividend investing for cash.  This is a simple investment in world-class dividend stocks and CEFs that pay monthly distribution.  This also provides a way to diversify your types of income by using various CEFs investments such as alternatives such as REITs, bonds and many other funds.

Investing with Credit Spreads for Higher Winning Percentages

As with all investments, the name of the game is “risk versus return.”  How much bang for the buck can you achieve for a given level of risk?  For many option-buying strategies, higher risk takes the form of lower winning percentages.  In fact, winning on fewer than half of your trades is quite normal.  The payoff, of
course, comes from the much higher profits you can achieve with these strategies, often in excess of 100%.

With credit spreads, the risk/reward paradigm is reversed.  You can reach winning percentages of 80% or higher using out-of-the-money options.  However,
the return per winning trade will be much lower, most often within the range of 10% to 25%.

A credit spread involves the simultaneous purchase and sale of puts (or calls) that expire at the same time, but have different strike prices.  Puts are used if you are bullish on the underlying stock or index, while calls are used for a bearish outlook.  For out-of-the-money credit spreads, the strike price of the sold (or written) option is closer to the underlying stock’s market price than the purchased option, and therefore carries a higher premium – resulting in a net credit.  The goal of a credit spread is for both options to expire worthless, allowing you to retain this entire net credit.

You may wonder why you would use puts for a bullish position and calls for a bearish position.  This is because you want the spread to finish out of the money, so you can achieve your maximum potential profit on the play.  Logically, then, puts will expire worthless on a bullish move, while calls will expire worthless on a bearish move.

Credit spreads offer two primary advantages over straight put or call purchases.  First, by using out-of-the-money options, you can profit from a wide range of outcomes, including the underlying stock moving somewhat against your expectations.  If you initiate a bearish credit spread with the sold call option 2% out of the money, you will keep the entire premium if the underlying security moves down, stays flat, or goes up 2%.  Only when the sold option slips into the money is your position at risk of losing value.  In addition, losses are generally capped at the difference between the strike prices of the options, minus the net credit collected upon initiation.

The second advantage is that no commission costs are incurred to exit your most successful trades, since the best-case scenario involves both options expiring worthless.  This feature increases your net return on a winning credit spread trade.  Moreover, unlike option purchases, credit spreads actually benefit from time decay, since neither option has any intrinsic value (as long as they stay out of the money), and the sold option will lose time value at a faster pace than the purchased option.

This is just one reason why we prefer to use front-month options for credit spreads.  In addition to providing the greatest exposure to time decay, these shorter-term options allow less time for the underlying equity to move substantially against you.  Such a move has a far more negative impact on a credit-spread position than the benefits of the underlying stock making a move in your favor.

How To Trade The Calendar Spread for Income

A calendar spread, which is often referred to as a time spread, is the buying and selling of a call option or the buying and selling of a put option of the same strike price but different expiration months.  In essence, you are selling a short-dated option and buying a longer-dated option.  This means that the result is a net debit to the account.  In fact, the sale of the short-dated option reduces the price of the long-dated option, making the trade less expensive than buying the long-dated option outright.  Because the two options expire in different months, this trade can take on many different forms as expiration months pass.

There are two types of long calendar spreads: call and put.  There are inherent advantages to trading a put calendar over a call calendar, but both are readily acceptable trades.  Whether you use calls or puts depends on your sentiment of the underlying investment vehicle.  If you are bullish, you would buy a calendar call spread.  If you are bearish, you would buy a calendar put spread.

A long calendar spread is a good strategy to use when you expect prices to expire at the value of the strike price you are trading at the expiry of the front-month option.  This strategy is ideal for a trader whose short-term sentiment is neutral.  Ideally, the short-dated option will expire out of the money.  Once this happens, the trader is left with a long option position.

If the trader still has a neutral forecast, he or she can choose to sell another option against the long position, legging into another spread.  On the other hand, if the trader now feels the stock will start to move in the direction of the longer-term forecast, he or she can leave the long position in play and reap the benefits of having unlimited profit potential.

How to Find Calendar Spread Candidates

 • Check the current value of implied volatility (IV) and the history of IV over the past three to six months (free at ivolatlity.com).  Be sure the current IV is in the bottom quartile of recent IV history.

• Don’t trade a negative IV skew (if ≤ 2 points, maybe… but doubtful).

• Investigate very carefully if the positive IV skew is ≥ 4 points (suggests a big move is expected).

• Calculate the standard deviation (σ) for the candidate stock; use current IV and number of days to expiration of the front month option; look at the price range (lowest to highest) of the past week and the past month; avoid this stock if the recent price ranges are > 1 σ.

• Be sure no earnings announcements or other significant announcements are pending during the course of the proposed trade.

• Be sure you are selling > $0.40 of option premium (otherwise, commissions eat up too much of your profit).

• Calculate the breakevens (BE) using your trading software; you want a broad range between the BEs.

• Low IV stocks (12–‐20%) are conservative but require a large number of contracts; consider the effect of commissions.  Stocks with higher IVs (≥ 20%) present more price movement risk but have large premiums

Managing the Trade – Making Trade Adjustments

 • When you have traded calendar spreads for at least 6 months, you may consider adjustments. Until then, simply close the trade when the stock price hits a BE or the trade hits the stop loss you established. 

• Use the BEs or a price just beyond the BEs as your trigger.

• Close a portion of your contracts and place another calendar at or near the new price; determine the number of contracts to close and roll up or down by the number it takes to move your position delta back closer to zero.

• For example, IBM is at $172 and we put on 10 contracts of a $175 call calendar. IBM moves to $176 (our upper BE); we close 4 of our $175 calendars and open 4 $180 call calendars.  If we think IBM may move even higher, we might place the new spreads at $185.

• Don’t adjust a trade if you have < 15 days left to expiration (unless you have multiple months, e.g., you have a Jun Sep $175 call calendar; we close some or all of our Jun $175 calls, and wish to roll up to $180 but we only have 8 days to expiration; then you would sell the July $180 calls).

• Manage the new calendar spread just like the original trade (write down your management criteria).

In summary, it is important to remember that a long calendar spread is a neutral – and in some instances a directional – trading strategy that is used when a trader expects a gradual or sideways movement in the short term and has more direction bias over the life of the longer-dated option.   This trade is constructed by selling a short-dated option and buying a longer-dated option, resulting in a net debit.  This spread can be created with either calls or puts, and therefore can be a bullish or bearish strategy.  The trader wants to see the short-dated option decay at a faster rate than the longer-dated option.  The time decay is your income just like it is in the covered call trade.

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